Thursday, March 12, 2015

Entertainment Fact & Fiction: 40 Facts About James Cameron's Terminator 2

We're continuing our Entertainment Fact & Fiction series with Terminator 2, James Cameron's awesome follow up to The Terminator. A bit watered down from the first movie, a little more PC, but still a fun action movie.

Here are 40 facts about James Cameron's Terminator 2:Judgement Day

To date, this is the only sequel to win an Academy Award when the previous movie wasn't even nominated.

In the audio commentary, James Cameron says that not only was the biker bar scene filmed across the street from where LAPD officers beat up Rodney King, but that they were filming the night of the beating.

One of the main percussive sounds of Brad Fiedel's score - the metallic beats of the Terminator theme - is not created by a synthesizer. It's Fiedel striking one of his cast-iron frying pans.

Robert Patrick trained in a rigorous running regime in order to be able to appear to run at high speeds without showing fatigue on film.

For the storm drain sequence, Arnold Schwarzenegger was in pain because, since he couldn't wear a glove while cocking the gun, his fingers would get stuck in the mechanism. He tore the skin from his fingers and hand many times before he mastered it; and he achieved this while trying to act and control a Harley at the same time as James Cameron told him where to look. He couldn't dart his eyes either because it would have ruined the shot. Shooting the gates also took weeks of practice because he had to also act cool while doing it.

A female passer-by actually wandered onto the biker bar set thinking it was real, despite walking past all the location trucks, cameras and lights. Seeing Arnold Schwarzenegger standing in the bar dressed only in boxer shorts, she wondered aloud what was going on, only for Schwarzenegger to reply that it was male stripper night.

The film takes place from June 8 to June 9, 1994 and in 2029.

Given Arnold Schwarzenegger's $15-million salary and his total of 700 words of dialog, he was paid $21,429 per word. "Hasta la vista, baby" cost $85,716.

This is the only 'Terminator' film to win (or be nominated for) an Oscar. It won 4 (and was nominated for 2 others).

Production took sufficiently long that Edward Furlong visibly aged during the shoot - he is clearly much younger in the desert, for instance, than in other scenes. His voice began to break and had to be pitched to one level in post-production.

The mini-gun used in the film was the same mini-gun that was used in 1987's Predator (1987) also starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.

According to James Cameron, Linda Hamilton suffered permanent hearing loss in one ear during the elevator shootout because she had not replaced her ear plugs after removing them between takes.

Special F/X guru Stan Winston and his crew studied hours of nuclear test footage in order to make Sarah Connor's "nuclear nightmare" scene as real as possible. In late 1991, members of several U.S. federal nuclear testing labs unofficially declared it "the most accurate depiction of a nuclear blast ever created for a fictional motion picture". For Sarah's nightmare of the nuclear holocaust, some of the materials used in the miniature Los Angeles model that mimicked all the destroyed masonry were Matzos crackers and Shredded Wheat. After each take, it would take on average two days to set the model up to shoot again.

Industrial Light and Magic's computer graphics department had to grow from six artists to almost 36 to accommodate all the work required to bring the T-1000 to life, costing $5.5 million and taking 8 months to produce, which ultimately amounted to 3.5 minutes of screen time.

The first film to have a production budget of more than US$100 million dollars.

Linda Hamilton's twin sister, Leslie Hamilton Gearren was used as a double in scenes involving two "Sarah Connors" (i.e., when the T1000 was imitating her), and in a scene not in the theatrical release (but on the DVD) as a mirror image of Linda.

The sound used for Arnold Schwarzenegger's shotgun is actually two cannons.

The "forced medication" scene (Special Edition only) had to be re-shot several times because actor Ken Gibbel wouldn't hit Linda Hamilton properly with his nightstick. The scene was very physically demanding and Hamilton was furious with Gibbel because he repeatedly botched it. She got her revenge in a later scene where she beats Gibbel with a broken-off broom handle - the blows are for real.

The idea to destroy the Cyberdyne Systems building to prevent the future war was in the first Terminator movie but was cut from the final release (you can see it in the deleted scenes section of The Terminator (1984) DVD.) James Cameron said it was lucky that he chose to cut that scene in 1984 as it forms the "nucleus" of Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991).

Pilot Charles A. Tamburro actually flew the helicopter under the overpass in the final chase scene. The camera crew refused to film the shot because of the high risk involved. James Cameron did the filming with the help of the camera car driver.

Out of all the time-traveling Terminators in the series, the T-1000 is the only one that doesn't have any first-person "Terminator vision" moments.

Carolco studio executives were nervous and concerned when the original budget of $75 million ballooned up to $88 million, with more to come. In order to keep the budget manageable, they proposed to eliminate a few scenes, particularly the opening biker bar scene where the Terminator was introduced. They tried to get Arnold Schwarzenegger to persuade James Cameron to remove that scene, but Schwarzenegger turned them down, saying, "Only a studio guy would cut a scene out like that."

On the DVD, by highlighting "Sensory Control" and pressing the right navigation button five times until the words "The Future is Not Set" appear, then selecting the phrase, the menu will alter, offering the Theatrical Version of the film instead of the Special Edition for viewing.

When the Terminator tells Sarah Connor about Miles Dyson and the history of Skynet, Arnold Schwarzenegger was reading his lines from a card taped to the car's windshield.

James Cameron asked special effects creator Stan Winston to direct a teaser-trailer. Cameron didn't want the trailer to just be early footage, and so with a budget of $150,000, Winston created a trailer that showed a futuristic assembly line churning out copies of Terminators, all of which looked like Arnold Schwarzenegger. Cameron was pleased with this trailer, as he had fears about audience reactions to trailers showing Schwarzenegger returning as a Terminator (after the Terminator in the first film was clearly destroyed).

For the sound of T-1000 passing through metal bars, sound designer Gary Rydstrom simply inverted an open can of dog food and recorded the close-packed food as it oozed slowly out. When transforming and flowing like mercury, the "metallic" sound is the spraying of Dust-Off into a mixture of flour and water, with a condom-sealed microphone submerged in the goo. For the sound of bullets striking the T-1000, inverted glass was slammed into a container of yogurt creating a combo sound of hard edge and goop.

The T800's bike jump into the storm drain was performed by stuntman Peter Kent. The motorbike was supported by one-inch cables, so that when they hit the ground, the bike and rider only weighed 180 pounds. The cables were later digitally erased.

After the release of The Abyss (1989) (featuring the infamous pseudo-pod scene), James Cameron felt he was ready to start working on this film. However, he knew that half of the film's rights was owned by Hemdale (producer of The Terminator (1984)) - ultimately went bankrupt - and the lack of funding prevented him from working. While working on Total Recall (1990) with Mario Kassar and Andrew G. Vajna, Arnold Schwarzenegger learned of Cameron's intention to work on the film and it was him who urged Kassar and Vajna to buy the rights from Hemdale. Finally, they bought it in February 1990 and Cameron would only start work the following month.

The T-1000 has four arms while in the helicopter. Two for flying the helicopter and two for firing and reloading the MP-5K submachine gun.

Local residents in Lakeview Terrace held a protest outside the Medical Center when it was dressed up to be the Pescadero State Hospital for the Criminally Insane. They quickly realized it was in fact only a film set.

Lead singer of heavy metal band WASP, Blackie Lawless, was considered for the role of the liquid-metal T-1000, although his height proved to be a problem. The role of the original Terminator had been written for a man of average stature, who could easily blend in to a crowd, and James Cameron wanted to apply that original concept to dramatic effect for the T-1000. In an AOL chat, Lawless explained: "Probably the biggest regret that I have, though I didn't turn it down, was a part in Terminator 2 that Robert Patrick got. Arnold Schwarzenegger wanted me to do the part, but when he found out I was 6'4", I couldn't. I regret not being able to do that."

The original script did not call for the top of the truck to be ripped off during the chase through the storm drain beside/beneath the freeway, but when they arrived on location they found that the cab wouldn't fit under the overpass so director James Cameron decided that the roof was going to have to come off.

The steel mill effects were so convincing, some former workers from the plant (which had been closed for over 10 years) thought it was up and running again.

Most of Edward Furlong's voice had to be re-dubbed by Furlong again in post-production because it changed during shooting. His young voice is left intact only in the scene where he and Terminator are talking about why people cry, because James Cameron wanted it to sound dramatic and thought it was better if left intact.

Sound designer Gary Rydstrom added some lion roars to the sounds of the tanker truck that the T-1000 drives down the freeway to add some extra menace.

All the electrical cabling meant to light the five-mile section of freeway during the liquid nitrogen truck chase was stolen. Not having enough time to replace all of it, the company had to rent or borrow every wire connected to the lighting on the freeway. That lasted for 5 days.

The Cyberdyne building in the movie is in fact a two-story structure in Fremont, CA. A phony third floor was constructed on top for the movie. Much of the structure was rebuilt after the filming and the building exists to this day.

The photos of the 1984 attack were still shots of a re-shoot. James Cameron had a hallway set built, dressed Arnold Schwarzenegger in his original Terminator outfit and had him recreate one take, from which they took the pictures. (Check out Arnold's hair and facial structure to spot the telltale signs.)

In the ATM scene, John uses an Atari Portfolio hand held computer.

The Terminators seen at the beginning of the movie were fully workable animatronic models.

Bonus Facts About Terminator, Because You Begged For It


The artificial substance used instead of melted steel (which would've been far too dangerous to use, sometimes impossible) actually needed to be kept pretty cool to maintain the right density. This meant that the temperature on set was really quite cold, so the actors had to be sprayed with fake sweat in between takes.

The name of Arnold Schwarzenegger's Terminator is the Terminator Series 800 (shiny metal endoskeleton) model 101 (Arnold's actual skin on that skeleton).

The pumps in the gas station forecourt, shown prior to the chip surgery scene, display the "Benthic Petroleum" logo. Benthic Petroleum was the company that owned the submersible drilling rig in one of James Cameron's other movies The Abyss (1989).

Billy Idol was James Cameron's original choice to play the T1000. A motorcycle accident prevented Idol from taking on the role.

Identical twins Don Stanton and Dan Stanton played the hospital security guard and the T1000.

The game that John plays in the Galleria is Missile Command. You protect your base by blowing up incoming missiles. Skynet's original intention was to be a missile defense system much like the game Missile Command.

The make-up artists mixed KY jelly into Arnold Schwarzenegger's make-up for the Terminator in "normal" mode to give him a slightly synthetic look.

A segment showing the design of the Time Displacement Machine which sent the Terminator and Kyle Reese back in the time in the first film was rejected for the sequel as it was too complicated and not necessary for plot development (plus it featured another rating problem for additional nudity, as Reese was required to go through the portal while naked). It would have consisted of three rings independently rotating around each other, with the subject to be displaced levitating in their center. The design ultimately resurfaced in 1997 as Jodie Foster's space traveling device in Contact (1997).

The address given in the movie for the Cyberdyne Building is 2144 Kramer Street. This is likely a reference to Joel Kramer, the stunt coordinator for the film.

The mall where the T-800 goes to look for John and fights the T-1000 is the Sherman Oaks Galleria, which has been used for many films. Arnold Schwarzenegger previously filmed another fight scene there in 'Commando' (1985).

Director James Cameron fought over the ending with executive producer Mario Kassar. Cameron wanted to end the film with the alternate Coda Ending (the older Sarah in future) as a bookend, but Kassar wanted to end the film in an another way (as a measure for possible sequels). He eventually relented when test audiences and Kassar himself reacted negatively over the coda ending, and he went the existing one, commenting that this coda was way too positive compared to bleak and dark tone of the rest of the movie.

The 10-gauge shotgun used by Arnold Schwarzenegger during the majority of the film is a six-shot Winchester Model 1887. It was invented by gun designer John Browning and was the first commercially successful repeating shotgun. James Cameron confirmed that it is a 10-gauge shotgun, not a 12-gauge, in the commentary.

Charlie Korsmo was offered the role of John Connor, but he could not accept the role due to obligations to What About Bob? (1991).

The mall scenes were spread out over two malls. The scenes shot outside the mall were filmed outside of the Northridge Fashion Center in Northridge California. This mall was closed for months after the Northridge earthquake destroyed much of it in 1994. Parts of the parking garage in the movie were destroyed in that earthquake.

Originally the Terminator was going to use a MAC-10 to shoot at the police but James Cameron decided to revisit the gun used in Predator (1987). The gun used the same custom Y-frame as in Predator with some modifications. The modified M60 fore-grip assembly was removed in its entirety. To replace it a "chainsaw" grip was mounted on the Y-frame and the M16-style carry handle was removed. This style of carry has become the "standard" for hand-held Miniguns in movies and video games. The Y-frame is still attached to the weapon's mounting lugs, though with no carry handle the weapon lost its sling attachment point forcing Arnold to carry all the weight of the weapon in his hands. In order to fire it, the Terminator carries a duffel bag full of ammo and possibly the batteries as well, as there are some shots that show what appear to be cables leading from the gun and into the duffel bag. It is also possible that the duffel bag was simply used to hide the fact that the cables trailed off set to the power supply and gun control unit.

The Terminator uses the following weapons throughout the movie: - Colt/Detonics 1911 9mm - Winchester 1887 Lever Action 10-Gauge Sawed-off Shotgun minus trigger guard - M79 'Blooper' Grenade Launcher - Hawk MM-1 37mm 12-shot gas grenade launcher - GE-134 Minigun 7.62x51mm cycle rate geared at 600rpm On the other hand, Sarah uses the following weapons: - Detonics 1911 custom long slide 45ACP - CAR-15 Rifle (at Dyson's house and at the truck) - Remington 870 shotgun with folding stock 12-Gauge (steel mill)

John's foster parents are named Todd and Janelle Voight. This means that if he'd legally taken their name, he would have been John Voight which is a modified spelling of actor Jon Voight's name.

In the teaser trailer, we see the T-101 is put into a machine called the "Bio-Flesh Regenerator" at the Endoskeleton factory, which grows and generates living human tissue onto the T-101, giving him his human form and emerges as Schwarzenegger. Kenner released a "Bio-Flesh Regenerator" play-set, which came with T-101 Terminator action figures. Which the T-101 Terminator is put into a special mold of Arnold Schwarzenegger and a gel-like flesh tone mixture. The mixture would be into the mold and would get squeezed and the T-101 Terminator action figures would replaced with naked Arnold Schwarzeneggers.

The police helicopter in the climactic chase scene (registration number N830RC) is a Bell 206B JetRanger II.

John Connor was born on February 28, 1985.

The blaster rifles The Terminators uses a weapons in the opening future battle sequence at the beginning of the film are called Endo Rifles.

The scene where the Terminator restarts after being 'shut down' by the T-1000 was not in the script and was added during editing because James Cameron felt that the audience will not be able to understand how the Terminator returns to deliver the final blow against the T-1000. According to the Arnold Schwarzenegger book 'The Life and Times', Cameron contacted Schwarzenegger, who was to go visiting his friend Bruce Willis for Christmas holidays to come back for shooting that crucial scene. Ultimately, Schwarzenegger had to cancel his holidays and filmed the scene. Therefore, the scene where the Terminator pulls the impaled metal rod off was shot on Christmas day itself.

As the Terminator's arm is being crushed by the gear, at the steel mill, you can see the initials "JC" for James Cameron written in blood on the Terminator's exposed leg.

The effect of the T-1000 freezing and breaking up was achieved through prosthetics attached to an amputee and with Robert Patrick's real limbs buried underneath the set.

Michael Biehn was the first choice for the role of the T-1000, in a complete reversal of roles with Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was now a hero. But this idea was abandoned as it was judged too confusing for viewers.

James Cameron's own screams are used for the death throes of the T-1000.

In the fight scene in the steel mill between the two Terminators, the set was dressed with rubber so the actors wouldn't hurt themselves when being flung around.

First Terminator movie to feature a T-800 model, which didn't kill anyone. None of the sequels' T-800s killed anyone either.


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