Sponsor

Latest Posts

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Entertainment Fact and Fiction - Sam Raimi's Spider-Man Movie Trivia

Sam Raimi's Spider-Man

Hugh Jackman revealed that he was supposed to have a brief cameo as Wolverine. Jackman actually showed up in New York to film the scene, but the entire plan was scrapped when the crew couldn't get access to the Wolverine costume from X-Men (2000).

One of the chief difficulties that Tobey Maguire experienced in the now-famous upside-down kissing scene was that his nose kept filling up with water as it was performed in driving rain.

The scene in which Peter Parker catches Mary Jane's lunch on the tray involved no CGI. With the help of a sticky substance to keep the tray planted on his hand, Tobey Maguire eventually (after many takes) performed the stunt exactly as seen.

By signing on for two sequels, Tobey Maguire secured himself a paycheck of $26 million.

Willem Dafoe performed 90% of his own stunts.

One of the reasons why Sam Raimi was a popular choice with Sony for the director's gig was because he is an avid comic book collector in his private life, with a collection of over 25,000.

To acquire his bumped-up physique, Tobey Maguire went through a strict five-month regimen of exercise, weight training and martial arts six times a week, as well as eating a high protein meal four to six times a day.

Tobey Maguire had to have his Spider-Man outfit slightly remodeled as the original design had not made any allowances for when the actor needed a bathroom break. A vent was added to enable him to perform that function without having to take the entire costume off.

Color costume considerations meant that Spider-Man was shot in front of a green screen, while the Green Goblin was shot in front of a blue one.

When Sam Raimi first offered to cast Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man, the studio was initially very reluctant. That was until they saw Maguire's test and they saw that the actor had clearly bulked up for the role.

In the comics, Peter Parker designed and made Spider-Man's synthetic spider web and the mechanical wrist guns that fire it. In the movie he shoots the web from his own body. Director Sam Raimi answered the protests of comic book fans saying that it was more credible to have Peter shoot web this way than for a high school boy to be able to produce a wonder adhesive in his spare time that 3M could not make.

After the terrorist attacks on the USA of 11 September 2001, Sony recalled teaser posters which showed a close-up of Spider-Man's face with the New York skyline (including, prominently, the World Trade Center towers) reflected in his eyes. Not all the posters were recovered, however, and the ones still at large are now highly prized collector's items.

The first Marvel movie to showcase the flipping pages Marvel logo.

When Peter Parker is testing out his webbing for the first time, he says several classic DC Comics (archrival of Marvel Comics) catchphrases, most notably "Up, up and away, Web!" (Superman) and "Shazam!" (DC's Captain Marvel, not to be confused with a same named Marvel Comics character). Tobey Maguire ad-libbed these lines, which were not in the original script.

One of Peter's sketches for his costume is of Marvel Comics superhero Stingray.

A welder building sets for the movie was killed on 6 March 2001 when a crane toppled onto a construction basket in which he was riding and struck him in the head.

Peter Parker's possible costume designs were drawn by Phil Jimenez, an artist on DC's "Wonder Woman".

Bonesaw, the wrestler Spider-Man fights for money, is played by real life wrestler Macho Man Randy Savage. Early in his career, Savage wrestled under the name The Spider.

James Franco's hair was dyed brown to give him some resemblance to Willem Dafoe, his screen father. This decision was only made after filming had begun. Indeed, in the scene where Harry visits Aunt May in hospital, you can see that Franco's hair is his usual black.

Leonardo DiCaprio was considered for the role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man.

The first scene filmed was when Peter returns from his field-trip, feverish after being bitten by the spider.

The Green Goblin was chosen as the film's main villain since Sam Raimi felt the father-son theme (Norman and Harry Osborn and Peter Parker) would make the film deeper.

The smoke in the lab during Norman Osborn's transformation scene was originally white but was then digitally altered to green. Director Sam Raimi wanted to use real green smoke, but went with the CG effect when prop designers could not create a colored smoke that was non-toxic.

The Green Goblin's costume was originally designed to be more bulky and armoured, but Willem Dafoe, having decided to film his own stunts, rejected it in favour of a more streamlined and athletic costume. The final outfit was composed of 580 pieces and took Dafoe half an hour to put on.

The scene when Peter and Mary Jane talk outside at night was shot at 4 am, and had to be shot quickly due to sunrise approaching. Kirsten Dunst also commented that it was a very cool morning weather-wise, and points out that her thermal underwear pants can be briefly seen peeking out above her pants line.

Spider-Man's webbing in the film is made out of foam materials and fishing line. It was also enhanced with CGI.

When two studio executives were shown shots of the computer generated Spider-Man, they believed it was actually Tobey Maguire performing the stunts.

The original trailer for the movie depicted a theft of a bank, with the robbers making a getaway in a helicopter. A close-up of the helicopter was shown, until the helicopter stopped, apparently caught in mid-air. As the camera zoomed out, it was shown that the helicopter was caught in a spider web, suspended between the two towers of the World Trade Center. After the attacks on the towers on 11 September 2001, however, the trailer was changed.

Although Uncle Ben claims to be 68 in the film, Cliff Robertson was 75 at the time of filming. Make-up artists still made him look a little older.

In addition to both Peter Parker and Norman Osborn wearing their enemy's costume colors during the Thanksgiving dinner scene, Harry Osborn is seen wearing all of the colors. He's wearing a green shirt, red tie and blue coat.

When Jameson's subordinates are trying to tell him about Spider-Man, one of them says, "Eddie's been trying to get a picture of him for weeks." This is a reference to Eddie Brock, a comic book character featured in Spider-Man 3 (2007).

When used in the trailer, the shot of Peter doing a long back-flip onto a car hood was digitally altered to put him in his Spider-Man outfit instead of his wrestling outfit.

Although Spider-Man is an iconic figure for New York, the majority of the film was actually made in Los Angeles. Only two weeks' worth of location filming was done in the Big Apple.

Elizabeth Banks auditioned for the role of Mary-Jane Watson before being cast as Betty Brant.

The genetically modified spider that bit Peter Parker was not a black widow spider but a Steatoda spider, which was chosen by Steven R. Kutcher and painted red and blue by Jens Schnabel while the spider was anesthetized.

James Cameron wrote a treatment for this film over the years as the rights to the character jumped between companies. Nearly all of his ideas were scrapped except for the biological web shooters.

John Travolta turned down the role of Norman Osborne.

In order to come up with the look of the high school kids, the costume department sent disposable cameras to schoolteachers in New York City and had them distribute them among their students to take pictures of each other.

According to visual effects supervisor John Dykstra, animating Spider-Man was the most sophisticated task he had accomplished at that time. Sam Raimi wanted to convey the essence of being Spider-Man ("the transition that occurs, between him being a young man going through puberty and being a superhero"); but the main difficulty was that as the character was masked, there was no context of eyes/mouth and it immediately lost a lot of characterization; thus the animators had to insert a lot of body language into his movements so that there would be some emotional content.

Stan Lee said in a radio interview that he thought John Cusack would be a perfect choice to play Spiderman/Peter Parker.

Doctor Octopus was in the early draft of the script to appear as the second bad guy. Later on in pre-production it was decided that he be reassigned to Spider-Man 2 (2004).

The owners of the billboards that surround Times Square attempted to sue Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc., Marvel Enterprises, and the other companies involved with the production of Spider-Man (2002) for "digitally superimposing advertisements for other companies over their billboard space in the film." The suit was thrown out by a federal judge in New York.

The film is based on a combination of both the Ultimate Spider-Man comic series and the original Amazing Spider-Man series. For instance, this incarnation of Mary Jane Watson (the "girl next door" version) is from the Ultimates series, while this version of the Green Goblin is from the original Amazing Spider-Man universe.
s
Kate Hudson and Tara Reid were considered for the role of Mary Jane Watson. Hudson was a heavy favorite for the role but turned it down in order to appear in The Four Feathers (2002).

The studio expressed an interest in Leonardo DiCaprio and Freddie Prinze Jr. playing the part of Spider-Man. Scott Speedman, Jay Rodan and James Franco all actually tested for the part.

Chris Columbus was offered the director's chair but opted to make Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) instead.

Pre-production planning for Spider-Man actually began in 1986 by Cannon Films. Later, Cannon sold the production rights to Carolco Pictures. Carolco would later sell the production rights to Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. Sony and Marvel produced the Spider-Man film we see today, released through Sony's Columbia Pictures division.

The Daily Bugle newspaper building is actually the Flatiron building, a famous Manhattan landmark that was built in 1902. In the comics, the Bugle's building is on East 38th Street and Second Avenue.

The theatrical release of the move ends with Aerosmith's cover of The Theme From Spider-Man (1967) that can be heard on the official soundtrack. For the DVD release it was changed to the original rendition of the theme.

James Cameron had a Spider-Man picture in mind early on in his career. In the early 1990s, Carolco Pictures hired him to write and direct a Spider-Man motion picture. While he originally wrote Doctor Octopus as the lone villain and had Arnold Schwarzenegger in mind for the role of Doc Ock, Cameron later wrote a new draft that featured Peter Parker as a high school senior in love with Mary Jane Watson and Spider-Man would fight two villains, Electro and Sandman. However, Electro was changed from electrical lineman Max Dillon to billionaire businessman Carlton Strand and Sandman was changed from crook Flint Marko to Strand's hired henchman, Boyd. Cameron had intended to cast Michael Biehn as Peter Parker. This is foreshadowed in earlier Cameron movies featuring Michael Biehn when his character gets bit on the hand in The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), and The Abyss (1989). This is a reference to the radioactive spider that bit Peter Parker's hand. However, the director couldn't make his Spider-Man movie when Carolco went bankrupt and soon after the movie rights to Spider-Man went into limbo for several years.

The Thanksgiving scene when Aunt May puts the turkey in front of Norman imitates the Norman Rockwell painting "Freedom From Want".

When Peter Parker is on his ceiling hiding from Mr. Osborn, a green sweatshirt with a beaver insignia can be seen on the ground. This is a sweatshirt from Sam Raimi's childhood camp, Tamakwa.

The second half of Spider-Man movie trivia continues tomorrow!

No comments:

Post a Comment