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Sunday, August 7, 2016

Movie Review - Electric Boogaloo The Wild Untold Story of Cannon Films



Electric Boogaloo The Wild Untold Story of Cannon Films - 7.5/10


When it comes to getting a good look at how the movie industry works, there aren't many behind the scenes movies or archival footage that seems to be readily available. Most of it sitting in some private vault somewhere, because there wasn't any real need to release it. No one thought that people would want to watch Hollywood executives negotiating deals and trying to get pictures made for two hours at a clip.

What makes Electric Boogaloo unique, is the perspective. Starting with Golan and Globus, the two bought Cannon Pictures for $500,000 and immediately tapped into the B picture market, by scraping the bottom of the Hollywood barrel for cheap scripts. They just didn't make bad action films. The movies they made were varied and ran across all genres. Breakin', The Last American Virgin, Bolero, Mata Hari, Lifeforce, Otello. The list goes on.

Golan and Globus hit their stride in the 80's, making up to 40 movies per year, with each release of their movies, it was set up so that the money they made would be used to finance the next film in production. Unfortunately, it didn't work out that way. Most of the movies were hyped up to the point that when they were screened, they were box office disappointments. Movies like Lifeforce or Masters of The Universe, obviously didn't live up to the standards that Golan and Globus pitched.

What's great about this documentary, is that it's a train wreck and you can't just stop watching it. Being able to watch Cannon Film Group finance these B-list movies and knowing what's going to happen to them, watching Golan and Globus pitch these same movies as if they were the next Star Wars or Rambo or whatever current blockbuster they were trying to remake. There are several lessons in the documentary, but watching these two carnival pitchmen, Golan and Globus, sell the hell out of their movies is magic. It's unfortunate that their bad decisions led to Cannon Films downfall, but the ride was amazing.

I cannot recommend this documentary enough. Writing about it, just barely scratches the surface of what this film gives us in terms of a real look inside a Hollywood studio that could, almost, do no wrong. Until the end of the Eighties happened and noone wanted to watch B-list movies any longer.

Thanks "The Eighties".

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