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Monday, February 27, 2017

Martin Scorsese Movie Trivia - The Top Ten Things You Need To Know About Casino

Casino



I wonder if they hired Jim Breuer to do the TV voice of Pesci for syndication...
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10.  The screenplay for Casino went through sixteen drafts.

9.  Casting director Ellen Lewis suggested casting Kevin Pollak, and Martin Scorsese agreed.

8.  The film was released on the 32nd anniversary of the JFK assassination.

7.  The film was released exactly five days after Martin Scorsese's 53rd birthday.

6.  When James Woods heard that Martin Scorsese was interested in working with him, Woods called Scorsese's office and left the following message: "Any time, any place, any part, any fee."

5.  The word "fuck" is said 435 times, including in the narration - 2.4 times per minute on average. The film held the record for the most uses of the word until the release of Summer of Sam (1999), which also has a reported 435 uses. The record was later broken by The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), which has close to 600 uses.

4.  The sunglasses that Robert De Niro wears in the scene when he meets Joe Pesci in the desert were selected by Mr. De Niro.

3.  Gene Siskel was one of the few critics to give this film a negative review. His colleague Roger Ebert, on the other hand, awarded it four out of four stars.

2.  Al Capone is mentioned twice in regards to The Black Book. Robert De Niro played Capone in The Untouchables (1987).

1.  Martin Scorsese said that his favorite shot in the film is the overhead shot of Sharon Stone at the craps table when she is throwing chips up in the air.
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EXTRAS


The "head in a vise" scene is taken from an anecdote in the book "Casino" unrelated to the main story, describing mob enforcer Tony Spilotro's interrogation of a low-level gangster named Billy McCarthy, who had committed the unauthorized murder on the Scalvo Brothers, a pair of high-ranking mobsters within Spilotro's crime organization. Trying to get McCarthy to give up the identity of the man who helped him kill the Scalvos, Spilotro first beat McCarthy, then stabbed him in the testicles with an icepick, before finally shoving his head in a vise and crunching it to five inches wide; McCarthy didn't give up the name of his partner, Jimmy Miraglia, until Spilotro tightened the vise in such a way that one of Billy's eyes popped out. Amazingly, McCarthy survived the head-crushing long enough for Spilotro to kill him by dousing him in lighter fluid and setting him ablaze. Spilotro would remark later in life, "Billy McCarthy was the toughest guy I ever met." (Jimmy Miraglia was subsequently shot dead and put in the trunk of his own car along with Billy's corpse).

Costume designer Rita Ryack said that the costumes are meant to reflect the nature of the story. Meaning that as the story becomes more chaotic the colours of the costumes become more chaotic.
The costume budget for the film was $1 million. Robert De Niro had 70 different costumes throughout the film, Sharon Stone had 40. Both actors were allowed to keep their costumes afterwards

The character of K.K. Ichikawa (Nobu Matsuhisa), the Japanese highroller, is based on the life of high roller Akio Kashiwagi. During the 70's and 80's, Kashiwagi was a big scene at Las Vegas casinos. By the end of the 1980s, however, Kashiwagi had used up his casino credit, owing many casino executives, among them Donald J. Trump, millions of dollars. He was murdered in his home in Tokyo by the yakuza (Japanese mafia) in 1992.

To avoid the continuity problems that accompany a chain-smoking movie character, Robert De Niro always held his cigarettes the same distance from the lit end so that their lengths never appear to change.

The casino scenes were shot at the Riviera between 1:00 am and 4:am so as not to get in the way of the real gamblers. Although the casino didn't want the shoot to interrupt its business, that didn't prevent it from trying to lure more punters inside by putting up a large banner that said, "Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci Filming the New Movie 'Casino' Inside!"

While the movie begins by stating it is based upon a true story, it never names the actual casino involved. The Tangiers casino is fictional. The story is actually based upon the history of the Stardust casino, a fact well documented in the Vegas history books. Martin Scorsese discreetly documents this fact via the soundtrack, in which the song "Stardust" is heard three different times. An instrumental version plays during Ace and Ginger's wedding and a vocal version is heard during the scene where Remo asks Marino if Nicky and Ginger are having sex and also during the very end of the final credits.

Close associates of the people portrayed in the film were on the set constantly, providing crucial and pivotal information.

When Nicholas Pileggi decided to write a book about Las Vegas he researched the story of Frank Rosenthal and became very interested. At first however, Frank Rosenthal was not interested in Pileggi's idea to write a book about him. It was only after Rosenthal read that a movie would be adapted from the book by Martin Scorsese and that it would star Robert De Niro that he became interested, because he loved Goodfellas (1990) and De Niro's performance in the film.

Dick Smothers' character, Senator, is partly based on Nevada Senator Harry Reid, who was chairman of the Nevada Gaming Commission. The scene in which Sam Rothstein is denied a license by the Nevada Gaming Commission is based on a December 1978 hearing when Harry Reid was the commission's chairman; some of Reid's statements are used in Smothers' dialogue. The scene was shot in an actual courtroom in the Clark County Courthouse, which was later closed in 2005.

In the Blu-ray commentary, Sharon Stone relates the story of how she came to be in the film. She says her first two auditions for Martin Scorsese ended up being cancelled for various mundane reasons-Scorsese was held up by another meeting, that sort of thing-and Stone's paranoia convinced her that he was blowing her off. When the director's people contacted her to try it a third time, she turned them down and went out to dinner with a friend instead. Scorsese tracked her down and showed up at the restaurant where she was dining to make a personal appeal.
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